Archive for ‘nature’

October 9, 2017

Lori’s Magical Mystery.

Illustrations (and some outtakes) for Kartik Shanker‘s deliciously moonsoon-soaked, irreverent, magical and mysterious book, Lori’s Magical Mystery (Puffin, 2017). Faint strains of the Beatles playing in the background, though we’re lost deep in the southern Western Ghats.

 

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August 29, 2016

A Conversation on Climate Change.

An illustration for Current Conservation Vol 10 Issue 2, for a conversation between Amitav Ghosh and Kartik Shanker on Ghosh’s newest book – The Great Derangement, and our apparent inability (even indifference) to the global effects of climate change, and how collective action to counter these are mired in opinion or belief rather than a considered response to facts. The illustration was created using the author’s analysis of modern historical events and current ways of living; making cataclysmic storms, tornadoes and rising sea levels possibly an inevitable result of anthropogenic climate change.

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August 17, 2016

Coral Reef Resilience.

Cover for Current Conservation Vol 10 Issue 2, showing the bleaching and gradual deterioration of corals in response to rising sea temperatures caused by climate change. Based on the article “Living with Change: local responses to global impacts in India’s oceanic coral reefs” by Rohan Arthur, Vardhan Patankar and Naveen Namboothri, in this issue.

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August 1, 2016

The Secret Sanctuary.

Cover and inside illustrations for The Secret Sanctuary, written by Stephen Alter (with Puffin, 2015) – a quirky, delightfully geeky book with creatures of all sizes (complete with scientific names), and where to possibly find them in real life. Perhaps the wistful lost naturalist of Flag Hill may be found there as well.

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January 6, 2016

Wolfmother.

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{ A monster-within-a-monster for Studio Kokaachi. }

 

December 29, 2014

The Alphabet of Animals and Birds.

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The Alphabet of Animals and Birds, a book of illustrated collective nouns that I wrote and illustrated (yay!!!) – has just been published by Red Turtle. Its oozing with murders of crows, rafts of otters, scoops of pelicans and many other pagefuls of animals and birds – useful group names to know for the next time you meet some of these creatures!

Here’s where you can buy the book:
Flipkart | Amazon 

A few pages from the book:

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October 16, 2014

The Constant Gardener.

My illustration for The Constant Gardener, an article on dugong feeding behaviour written by Elrika D’Souza and Vardhan Patankar, for Current Conservation magazine’s issue 8.2.

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The article describes how dugongs feed in seagrass meadows (their principal food source) by completely grazing them down; and leaving these fields for other areas for a time long enough to allow the depleted areas to regenerate. Thus the dugongs tend to these meadows like gardeners, ensuring for themselves a supply of desirable, high-nutrition seagrass species — while keeping the growth of low-nutrition high-fibre species down through their grazing cycles.

The illustration shows a pair of dugongs working through some seagrass fields, leaving “trails” which eventually grow over again.

Read the article here.

MORE: On Vardhan’s blog, more details on the ongoing dugong study in the Andaman & Nicobar archipelago; on how dugong conservation efforts involve caring for its habitat and involving the local communities in protecting this species.

October 11, 2014

Found Lepard.

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I have been thinking on leopards for a long time now.

They weave in and out at the fringes of our cities, pass quietly through our villages. A leopard may well be your neighbour next door, him of the night-shifts, whom you never see except for the chance encounter when you see a (his?!) paw pull in the milk packets left on his doorstep. You might possibly never ever see the modern urban leopard, oh, but he sees you.

As the forests dwindle into spotty fragments, leopards and other beings of the forest are brought into awkward and sometimes unfortunate encounters with humans. Some leopards end up being spotted by some especially social humans who muster a crowd of more humans within bewildering seconds. It’s well-known that leopards are no good at parties and social situations, and would much rather get out of it and do what they’re good at instead – stalking real prey they can eat and climbing trees Like A Boss.

Still, we seem bent on forcing leopards to join us in the great City Life. These cats of secrets and shadows now already live amongst us, seeing from high places the Truth and the future. They hear the word of the street, the calls from the dark places where people and animals live – where so many prefer not to look in case they find them.

Found Lepard began as a series of notices and flyers mobilising all the cats in the vicinity at short notice, to make a stand against the Powers That Be which refuse to explain themselves.

Here is a Found Lepard in Kulture Shop‘s newest themed collection, Urban Jungle.

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He’s on art tees and art prints – currently in the Kulture Shop showroom in Bandra; soon to be found online.

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Here are some of the other leopards in the series.

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